Abraham in Arms

Created on February 4th 2008

a-in-a-small.jpgAbraham in Arms:  War and Gender in Colonial New England (2007)

now available in paperback!

winner of an Honourable Mention for the 2008 Albert B. Corey Prize/Prix Corey, which is awarded every other year jointly with the American Historical Association to the best book in Canadian-American history.

Reviews:

–in The Boston Globe, December 31, 2007

–on H-NewEngland, July 2007

–in the Journal of American History, September 2007

–in the American Historical Review, December 2007

Related essays by Ann Little:

Echoes of Very Distant Wars

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10 Responses to “Abraham in Arms”

  1. No more photos from Abu Ghraib because of rape scenes? : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 28 May 2009 at 8:09 am #

    [...] was invited to a university to give a talk about Abraham in Arms when it was first published, and a woman in the audience (herself a women’s historian) [...]

  2. Honourable Mention! What an honour! : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 06 Jul 2009 at 7:42 am #

    [...] Abraham in Arms:  War and Gender in Colonial New England won an Honourable Mention for the 2008 Albert B. Corey Prize/Prix Corey from the Canadian Historical Association.  The prize is awarded every other year jointly with the American Historical Association to the best book in Canadian-American history.  Should the winner of the 2008 Corey Prize (Sharon A. Roger Hepburn, for Crossing the Border: A Free Black Community in Canada, University of Illinois Press, 2007) be unable to fulfill her duties, I’ll be happy to swing into action.  Here’s the flattering and generous citation from the CHA: Abraham in Arms argues that religious ideas about gender and family provided the vital context in which the people of colonial New England, New France, and “Indian Country” understood the cross-cultural warfare between them through the 17th and 18th centuries. It is a richly imaginative and theoretically innovative fusion of religion, gender, family, diplomacy, and war that offers yet another persuasive argument that no study of war can avoid addressing the social role of gender and family life in animating the normative use of violence. It is a book destined to be influential to historians of other times and places. [...]

  3. Guns and gender: “many say” that men don’t know what the hell they’re talking about : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 05 Dec 2009 at 11:13 am #

    [...] not only are we the inheritors of a legacy of gun ownership that is deeply gendered (see my book if you want the details.  It’s true!  Girls write about the historical patterns and meaning [...]

  4. Does warfare ever change over time? : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 03 May 2011 at 10:27 am #

    [...] I wrote a whole book about this kind of rhetoric in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.  I kept searching for change over time, extending the end date of my project, but I never found it.  Clearly, I could have extended it to the present, because Bin Laden was hardly a man, he was hiding behind a girl when they got’im!  And he lived a life of effeminacy and luxury, not manly self-sacrifice or military discipline.  I especially liked that touch that “he may have used one of his wives as a shield.”  It’s the same objectification of Muslim women’s misery and drudgery that’s always in play in wars with Western powers, with a bonus dig at the manhood of a Muslim man found cowering behind a woman’s skirts before his spectacularly violent death.  Behold the power of the narrative:  Anglo-American colonists were fond of tsk-tsking about the fate of “squaw drudges,” Indian women who were made to toil endlessly in the fields while their husbands played at sport like fishing and hunting.  [...]

  5. A mitzvah: pass it on! : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 15 May 2012 at 11:48 am #

    [...] to a graduate seminar this quarter and who wanted to tell me how much he and his students liked my book.  (This was in a seminar in which they apparently scorched nearly every other book–unfairly, [...]

  6. The big reveal! Historiann has a face for C-SPAN 3. : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 20 Dec 2012 at 8:33 am #

    [...] always had a personal interest in clothing and fashion, and wrote both an article and a chapter in Abraham in Arms on the stripping and redressing of war captives of Indians and the many meanings of the exchange of [...]

  7. A dumb and dishonest view of American history education in Texas : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 12 Jan 2013 at 2:14 pm #

    [...] I wonder, would the NAS do with me, a historian of women, gender, and sexuality, who wrote a book that has “war” as the first word in the subtitle, and which has been review…  Hey, NAS:  I’m writing a book about a Catholic nun now–does that make me a historian [...]

  8. Being Cliven Bundy : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 26 Apr 2014 at 8:51 am #

    […] white men.  The racialized and gendered nature of gun ownership and gun violence–something I’ve written about in my first book as well as through most of the six years this blog has existed–is historically very deep and […]

  9. RED ALERT! Representing women’s & gender history at the Omohundro Institute’s annual conference : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 01 Jul 2014 at 3:51 pm #

    […] Mary Rowlandson’s Captivity Narrative,” (a subject I’ve written about before, in Abraham in Arms.)  Skemp […]

  10. Like Bowe Bergdahl, many 18th century captives didn’t go home again : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present on 14 Jul 2014 at 4:57 pm #

    […] about these captives, especially the girls and women who didn’t return, in chapter four of Abraham in Arms.)  In the case I cited last month in my analysis, Sylvanus Johnson–a child captive from age […]

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