Comments on: Returning POWs, eighteenth-century style http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sun, 28 Sep 2014 10:58:43 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Like Bowe Bergdahl, many 18th century captives didn’t go home again : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2294506 Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:57:58 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2294506 […] Per my comparison of recently freed Taliban captive Bowe Bergdahl to Anglo-American captives of the …, the Wall Street Journal reports that so far, “Sgt. Bergdahl has refused to see his parents or speak to them on the phone, the official said. The decision by Sgt. Bergdahl, who returned to regular duty on Monday, suggests a deeper estrangement between the soldier and his parents than the military understood when he was released. Still, officials said, they don’t know the precise cause of the tension or when it began.” […]

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2221849 Sun, 22 Jun 2014 23:03:31 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2221849 Wow–that’s interesting. Thanks for letting me know. It’s a little sad, although I wonder if this is just the natural consequence of the aging of the order. With no nuns teaching there any longer (at least, I thought that’s been the case for several years, since before they admitted boys), giving up administrative control of the school seems like a natural consequence.

Feminism and prosperity have doomed women’s religious orders, at least for our time I think. Maybe contagion, economic and/or environmental collapse, or some other major catastrope will fill the monasteries again. I was just thinking that that generation of young Quebecois women who came into the order b/c of the depression were likely mostly superannuated, if not all dead yet. Perhaps there are a few pre-Vat II nuns around, but not that many.

I’ve been out of town but will update my blogroll v. soon as promised. Peace be with you Father.

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By: P.-F.-X. http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2220957 Sun, 22 Jun 2014 16:26:50 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2220957 Coming from you, Historiann, it means a lot. Thanks!

BTW: My latest post may indeed be of particular interest to you, given your Ursuleanings of recent years.

P.-F.-X.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2212637 Fri, 20 Jun 2014 03:07:57 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2212637 I love your blog! Will blogroll you immediately, Father. (Don’t hide your light under a bushel!)

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By: P.-F.-X. http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2211839 Thu, 19 Jun 2014 21:02:12 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2211839 Only a pale latter-day imitation, I fear.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2211704 Thu, 19 Jun 2014 20:03:39 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2211704 Thanks, Father Charlevoix! I was away from my copy of UC when I wrote that comment, & am even farther away now. (Though Google books might be a source, too.)

(I am speaking to P.F.X. Charlevoix, no?)

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By: P.-F.-X. http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2211616 Thu, 19 Jun 2014 19:21:34 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2211616 Hi Historiann,

Longtime reader, first time contributor. Garraty and Carnes’ textbook no doubt used Demos’s book as their source, as he himself does note that Eunice took on the name of Gannenstenhawi — She Brings In the Corn — and takes the opportunity to riff on Mohawk naming practices and gender roles. In my edition of Unredeemed Captive: pp. 159-162.

Warm regards,

P.-F.-X.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2204374 Tue, 17 Jun 2014 21:44:44 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2204374 Thanks! I was just curious about your source, not giving you the third degree (or at least I didn’t want it to seem that aggro.) That’s all–I wasn’t familiar with the name Gannenstenhawi & was interested to hear your source.

If you’re interested, I have a copy of the “true and perfect Memoriall” Schuyler writes about his May 26, 1713 meeting with Eunice/Margaret/A’ongote/Gannenstenhawi. Interestingly, in this document he calls her only “Margaret,” her French Catholic baptismal name, perhaps because their meeting was brokered by a priest. If you think it might be interesting or useful to you in your teaching, let me know at my colostate.edu email address and I’ll send you a copy.

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By: smalltownprof http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2203157 Tue, 17 Jun 2014 13:03:01 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2203157 THE AMERICAN NATION by Garraty and Carnes, 14th edition, volume 1, page 91. You are right, her father was not present at the meeting. It was attended by “a trader sent by her father.” But this module in the book specifically states her Indian name as “Gannenstenhawi”or “she who brings in corn.” I’ll be real honest here, I didn’t expect to get grilled so much for my posting, I just thought it was an interesting similarity. I have used this module many times with my students and it has sparked some interesting discussion. In the fall I can compare her situation to that of Bergdahl. Thanks so much and have a great day.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2014/06/11/returning-pows-eighteenth-century-style/comment-page-1/#comment-2199903 Mon, 16 Jun 2014 14:29:13 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=22887#comment-2199903 Which is. . . ?

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