December
26th 2013
Who pays the price for a weaponized nation?

Posted under: American history, childhood, Gender, local news, unhappy endings

Anyone who lives in a home with a gun is at risk to kill or be killed:

A man who told police he shot and killed his 14-year-old stepdaughter after mistaking her for a burglar is a 29-year-old Fort Carson officer with multiple deployments behind him and a Bronze Star for service.

Sources on Wednesday confirmed that 2nd Lt. Daniel R. Meade is at the center of the tragedy that has drawn headlines across the world.

A dispatch recording suggests that Meade opened fire on the girl about 6 a.m. Monday as she was crawling through a window of a home in the 4000 block of Ascendant Drive, off North Carefree Circle and Peterson Road.

She died of her wounds at a Colorado Springs hospital later that day.

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While investigators kept mum this week, media websites that picked up the story exploded with reader-driven debates over access to guns and Colorado’s so-called Make My Day law, which allows Colorado residents to use deadly force inside their homes if they believe an intruder is intent on harming them or committing a crime.

The law turns on whether the homeowner had the “reasonable belief” that a crime was imminent, and the answer to that question will likely determine whether charges will be filed in this case.

I wonder which would be worse, if this was indeed an accidental shooting:  to be an Army officer prosecuted for killing a child in her own home, or to be an army officer not prosecuted for killing a child in her own home?

4 Comments »

4 Responses to “Who pays the price for a weaponized nation?”

  1. Susan on 27 Dec 2013 at 7:26 pm #

    I’ve now read this post three times, trying to find words, but it’s just so painful. And if it was in fact an accident, my sense is that Meade is prosecuting himself right now. It would be hard to live with yourself, I imagine. (And this is different from the Trayvon Martin case, and other such cases, as the victim was known to the shooter.)

    When will we learn?

  2. delagar on 27 Dec 2013 at 9:30 pm #

    The layout here is a little over-dramatic. But the numbers are worth thinking about:

    http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/mass-killings/index.html#title

  3. delagar on 27 Dec 2013 at 9:33 pm #

    As Echidne noted over at her blog, two of the take-aways from that data are these: (1) You’re more likely to be killed by a member of your family than by anyone else and (2) 94% of the killers are male.

    Oddly, that last datum never gets stressed.

  4. Shelley on 29 Dec 2013 at 10:46 am #

    It’s hard to find a more despair-inducing subject today than the gap between what most people want done about guns, and the difficulty in getting anything done.

    The more guns, the more scared people feel, and the more scared people feel, the less thinking, the more guns.