Comments on: Hark, a job! Assistant Professor, modern Britain, Baa Ram U. http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sat, 20 Sep 2014 17:08:06 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Feminist Avatar http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1115078 Mon, 15 Oct 2012 07:58:19 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1115078 Well, it’s true that you have to claim that a non-EU job candidate is not replicable in Europe, but in academia, this is remarkably easy, because literally you’re the only person that has written your PhD. And, this is grounds that universities use to apply for a visa for you – that your research is good for society and no one else can do your research. How long a visa takes is often more about the speed of bureaucracy than anything else. How easy it is really depends on how many hoops they make you jump through, not the length of time it sits in a pile somewhere. So, my visa to Australia was easy because I filled in an online form, uploaded a whole whack of documentation to prove who I was and waited. And hey presto, several months later, with no other questions asked, no need to prove savings, or anything like that.

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By: J. Otto Pohl http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1114708 Sun, 14 Oct 2012 22:28:26 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1114708 Feminist Avatar: When I was at SOAS there was only one American there, my supervisor Ben Fortna. Nobody in my PhD cohort or the one before it had any opportunity to teach at SOAS. It was my understanding that this was typical for the UK. My understanding of EU law is that they must prove that there is no EU national capable of doing the job including the entire population of Poland before they can consider somebody from outside the EU. Even getting a work permit and residency permit in Ghana is difficult. My first one too nine months to get and the second one four. But, it is a lot easier to prove that there are no Ghanaian applicants capable of doing my job than proving the case for all of Europe. Yes there are lots of Oxford and Cambridge PhDs in the US. But, no search committee has even ever heard of SOAS so the two are not really comparable. If publications really were important I should have at least gotten one interview out of the more than 300 positions in the US for which I applied.

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By: Feminist Avatar http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1113881 Sun, 14 Oct 2012 02:23:46 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1113881 I had teaching experience on finishing my UK PhD, and I don’t know many people who didn’t. Most institutions try to make sure their PhD students get some, so in that SOAS really let you down.

And, I don’t think I’ve worked at any institution in the UK or elsewhere that didn’t contain at least one American on staff (many had several). I also know many Americans who work in other parts of Europe. Getting a working visa for an American academic in Europe isn’t particularly difficult if the university wants you. I mean half of SOAS’s history department are American!Similarly, half of the Ivy League is filled with Oxbridge PhDs (or rather DPhils!), so a lack of coursework is clearly not debilitating.

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By: J. Otto Pohl http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1111523 Thu, 11 Oct 2012 14:04:02 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1111523 A publication record of two books and several journal articles did not help me get any interviews in the US either. It is quite apparent that US institutions will always prefer a US ABD with no publications to a PhD from SOAS with two books and several journal articles. The primary reason for hiring somebody in the US seems to always be that they had been a TA at a US institution. Almost everybody hired for the slots I applied for in the US had fewer publications than me and often they were still ABD. Yet I keep reading on the Internet that publications are the most important thing in hiring. This is clearly not the case. If you really do think publications are the most important thing than just hire the person with the most and forget about openly discriminatory measures such as requiring teaching experience or coursework. Because if you get a PhD in the UK you are not going to have either upon completion and there is no way then to ever, ever, get any such experience in the US. Once you miss out on a US TAship it is impossible to ever get an academic interview in the US. I suppose would be fine if it were limited to UK citizens who can legally work in the EU. But, it also effectively bans US citizens like myself from ever working in our home country due to having a British degree while at the same time being banned from working in the EU for having a US passport. If it were not for Africa there would be no possible places in the English speaking world for us to work.

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By: truffula http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1110580 Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:13:46 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1110580 I work in a fairly theoretical research area that would be nothing without a close connection to fieldwork. In my observation, our brightest luminaries tend to be the folks who combine the very theoretical with impeccable field skills and these people tend to burn bright throughout their careers. I’ve also noticed a sort of “mid life crisis” pattern in which theoreticians suddenly turn toward building observational instrumentation (and taking it out into the wild somewhere to see how it works).

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By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1110467 Wed, 10 Oct 2012 16:14:09 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1110467 I was fascinated by CPP’s distinction between the “analytical” and the “experimental” sciences, even leaving out of the equation the stated implications about the consequences of “extended fermentation,” i.e., *aging*, on intellectual development trajectories. It’s been a cliche in some contexts that mathematicians and some even say musicians “do their best work” before [fill in the age here]. There are even prize criteria framed around that. But the distinction CPP makes within what some of us humanists might just lump together as “the sciences” is interesting on this and probably a number of other accounts. I wonder what comparable “fine score marks” between various arts and humanities disciplines there might be that those of us within them recognize intuitively and operate around but have never bothered to treat or categorize explicitly? Might make the basis for a whole ‘nuther thread.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1110402 Wed, 10 Oct 2012 14:59:50 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1110402 I wouldn’t say it’s rated higher, Otto; much of the language in the job ad is boilerplate, and because we have a Briton on the staff, we’ve discussed the fact that many British unis don’t have traditional coursework or a U.S.-style transcript available. Like I said above, it’s more important for people at early stages of their careers, less important for those with a record of publication and teaching.

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By: J. Otto Pohl http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1110346 Wed, 10 Oct 2012 13:59:29 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1110346 The transcripts and classes are a problem since you are asking for an expert on British history. A PhD in the UK has no course work attached to it. Yet, it seems reasonable that some of the people specializing in British history might have gotten their degree from the UK. Having a UK degree from SOAS was one of the things that prevented me from ever getting an interview in the US. Really why is coursework rated higher than publications and the actual degree at this stage in hiring in the US?

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1110279 Wed, 10 Oct 2012 12:24:02 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1110279 FA–contact me by e-mail and we can talk further if you like, or perhaps it’s time to direct your inquiries to the search chair. I encourage you to apply–why not?–and my department likes international people and perspectives.

As Susan suggests, if you have a book manuscript or a book in press and some teaching experience, transcripts are overall a less important component of your dossier than if you are straight out of school.

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By: Feminist Avatar http://www.historiann.com/2012/10/08/hark-a-job-assistant-professor-modern-britain-baa-ram-u/comment-page-1/#comment-1109917 Wed, 10 Oct 2012 04:51:02 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19693#comment-1109917 Thanks for answering my questions. It’s very tempting as this job ad is made for me, but I’ve just done one continental shift…

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