Comments on: MOOCs for Mooks: local proffie takes one out for a spin http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Tue, 23 Sep 2014 15:56:07 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Mamie http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1102589 Tue, 02 Oct 2012 19:21:09 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1102589 Rees’s pieces are a fine companion to Catherine Stimpson’s essay on becoming a Phoenix (or as she says, a Phoenician), in the CHE.

She took a creative-writing course online. Then she told all.

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By: Susan http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1101425 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 23:29:17 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1101425 Well, where I am, if you were a ladder faculty, I think you’d face issues at merit reviews, and you’d probably also face a faculty disciplinary procedure for your conduct in the classroom, for “failure to meet responsibilities of instruction”. For lecturers and untenured faculty, it would be the kiss of death.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1101381 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 21:40:36 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1101381 Susan, your comment (snarky as it is!) raises an interesting question about online ed, which goes back to the issue of intellectual property that concerns a lot of folks who are under pressure to develop online courses.

What could a university–esp. a university encouraging their faculty to teach online, or to hire and manage adjuncts to do this–do to a faculty member who declined to deliver hir own lectures and just plugged in Adelman’s lectures, for example? Would the students feel cheated? Would the university see that as a violation of the faculty member’s contract? Would the students feel like it was pointless to do their coursework honestly, and just cheat their way through?

How far does it all go?

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By: Susan http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1101359 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 20:52:04 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1101359 Oh, and I thought that next time I taught World History I could just crib my lectures off the web!

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1101270 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 17:34:02 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1101270 IOW, I suspect that the limits of MOOCS and online ed are well known to our corrupt elites, and that their limitations are not bugs, they’re features.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1101266 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 17:27:51 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1101266 This is right on: “Meanwhile, elites will continue to send their children to ivy-clad brick and mortar campuses for small class sizes with real live professors and real live opportunities to pledge into the networks of the ruling class.”

This has always been my objection to online ed. While some web interface has value for some programs (again, the MLS or MLIS M.A. programs–good for them!) But gen ed courses for first-generation undergrads who need to learn how to do college, not just a bunch of information in a webcast lecture? Not so much.

I feel like everyone needs to re-read Charles Dickens’ Hard Times, and think hard about the Gradgrindian nostrums that are being pushed in lieu of real education simply because they’re cheaper and because all they can do is push the “facts.”

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By: quixote http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1101152 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 13:32:40 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1101152 koshembos, how about the concept that you do a fine job in your web-assisted classes, and that that is a whole different ballgame than a MOOC? Come back when you’ve grasped the distinction.

Telling the people to give up who are refusing to go gently into that good night either means you don’t get it or you’re part of the problem.

(You did say the gloves should come off.)

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By: Nursing Clio http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1101118 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 12:13:32 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1101118 Thanks for posting this and NC will check out the class on C-SPAN. Keep us update when it will air.

I also am going to email my husband this piece because he works in online education. Universities hire his company to set up online programs and we were just talking about MOOCs the other day (yeah our conversations at the dinner table are always exciting) ~ckl.

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By: truffula http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1100923 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 06:09:30 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1100923 I’m pretty sure that “read the material online” is not the same as teaching online.

My concern about MOOCs has as much to do with class as pedagogy. If these types of classes come to be understood as equivalent to real live classrooms, they will be the least-cost default for the hoi polloi. Meanwhile, elites will continue to send their children to ivy-clad brick and mortar campuses for small class sizes with real live professors and real live opportunities to pledge into the networks of the ruling class.

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By: koshembos http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/29/moocs-for-mooks-local-proffie-takes-one-out-for-a-spin/comment-page-1/#comment-1100838 Sun, 30 Sep 2012 03:39:24 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19632#comment-1100838 It’s time to take off the gloves. Several observations from my perspective: Many decent universities don’t contemplate replacing all regular classes with online courses. The use of online material is essential for the evolution of university education. A mix of online and in class, called by some hybrid, courses may actually improve the quality of teaching and learning.

In other words, if you scream 24/7 “online in coming” you are simply fighting the wrong war.

Current I teach a course on an evolving approach to health care. No textbooks of value exist; they will in 5-10 years. 60% of the material is surveying methods and tools. The rest requires discussion, rigorous work, statistics and some cryptography. The students read the material online. They prepare presentations to the class. We meet every other week. This way we cover more material, the students must know the material and we have plenty of time to get in-depth work.

This class is way more productive for both sides than when I talked my rear end off for 3 hours every week and then checked assignments and exams. The latter is downright obsolete mindlessness.

By the the Australians have the “School of the Air” since 1951. It works! (Now it works on the Internet.)

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