Comments on: Mary Beth Norton: A Founding Mother tells all. http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sat, 27 Sep 2014 05:28:47 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Trilogies, trade presses, and books in print: part III of my interview with Mary Beth Norton : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1092314 Tue, 18 Sep 2012 15:12:53 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1092314 [...] a conference in her honor in Ithaca, New York September 28 and 29.  (If you’ve missed part I and part II, get yourself caught up and then read on.)  Here, we talk about her decision to to [...]

]]>
By: Feminist mentors and feminist activism: part II of my interview with Mary Beth Norton : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091535 Mon, 17 Sep 2012 11:45:51 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091535 [...] Today’s post is part two of a three-part interview with Mary Beth Norton.  If you missed yesterday’s post, catch it here and get with the program!  [...]

]]>
By: Feminist Avatar http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091340 Mon, 17 Sep 2012 05:36:20 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091340 Liberty’s Daughters got a fair few footnotes in my book too, and I’m a Scottish historian. I, however, feel the same sense of pain as Mary Beth Norton that historians of Europe/the (ex-)European colonies have to read English history, and that we all make the English comparison when explaining the peculiarities of our own countries of interest, but so few English historians bother to engage with the histories of other nations. And, this is especially annoying in the case of Scotland, with whom they shared a blinking monarch and later a parliament for the last several hundred years.

]]>
By: Nursing Clio http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091194 Mon, 17 Sep 2012 00:07:42 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091194 This was great! I cannot wait to read the other parts and share them on NC’s FB page.

Oh and BTW, I have suggested Norton’s book on Salem to several of my students who are developing a historical fiction piece on Salem.

]]>
By: Molly Warsh http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091151 Sun, 16 Sep 2012 22:12:39 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091151 What a great tribute to the amazing MBN, Historiann! I enjoyed this first installment so much, and have loved reading people’s comments and stories above, too. Mary Beth has mentored so many people at so many different stages of their careers. What a wonderful, generous, and rigorous scholar and woman she is.

]]>
By: Mary Beth Norton http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091147 Sun, 16 Sep 2012 22:05:20 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091147 Susan, you weren’t the one who reported the comment, but I’m not surprised you heard something similar as people (men) did say the same to me directly.
And Janice, whoever you are, thanks for being an English historian interested in the folks who moved across the Atlantic! I have long bewailed the fact that although Early Americanists read English history, the reverse so rarely seems to occur (this doesn’t include you, Susan, especially not since your most recent work on the Caribbean moved you across the pond.)

]]>
By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091140 Sun, 16 Sep 2012 21:50:27 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091140 It’s hard to imagine a senior scholar back then–when I was in graduate school–who would have tolerated, much less encouraged, someone to stand pat with a line of work that they regarded as being merely “perfectly OK,” so this sounds even more casually dismissive the more you look at it. It’s a good thing that MBN just ignored it, but what if she hadn’t had tenure? Then again, back then I sat in a graduate seminar in which the professor–who was also the graduate chair–called the male students “Mr.” and the (two) women by their first names, which he almost literally invariably transposed!

]]>
By: Janice http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091139 Sun, 16 Sep 2012 21:49:41 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091139 Oh, Historiann – I’m loving this! Mary Beth Norton’s work is informing my current research on early modern English stepmothers as I work to understand authority within the family. I need to learn much more about Colonial America since that makes an important branch of early modern history. Her books have been eye-opening for the events I never studied before, at least not in any depth!, as well as the insightful analysis.

]]>
By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091102 Sun, 16 Sep 2012 20:09:48 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091102 The next two installments are even more dishalicious!

(This comment looks idiotic now that I’ve found and rescued Susan Amussen’s comment from my SPAM filter, but it was originally written in response to CPP’s comment.)

And now for a more informed conversation. Carry on, friends!

]]>
By: Susan Amussen http://www.historiann.com/2012/09/16/mary-beth-norton-a-founding-mother-tells-all/comment-page-1/#comment-1091094 Sun, 16 Sep 2012 19:51:39 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19543#comment-1091094 Reading Mary Beth’s comments — which recalled the world when I entered grad school in the late 1970s — made me rethink a conversation here a few weeks ago. As marginal as we sometimes think women’s history still is, it’s useful to remember back to the time when there was almost nothing. The “senior” women doing women’s history (especially anything before the 19th C) were newly tenured women like Mary Beth. So while the continued blindness of many scholars to issues of gender is a source of constant annoyance, women are far more visible now as historians and subjects of history than they were 35 years ago. So maybe we should pay attention to the half full glass as well as the half empty one?

And while I’m not sure I’m the one who reported the “loyalists were OK” line, I know I heard a similar comment from an eminent historian of the period. Gah.

I was lucky enough to start my career with a post-doc at Cornell, where I had Mary Beth as a colleague. She has been a model of intellectual rigor and historical curiosity, as well as zest for living. Thank you, Mary Beth!

]]>