Comments on: I, at least, ain’t got the do-re-mi http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sat, 20 Sep 2014 06:11:01 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Giving to the office at the office: are you f^(king kidding me? : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-2033039 Mon, 05 May 2014 01:49:38 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-2033039 […] underpaid compared to our “peers” at our own “peer institutions.”  I also didn’t get a dime’s worth of a raise between 2008 and 2012, and when I finally go…  Seriously.  Another 25% of the rest of my irritation stems from all of the unpaid labor I do […]

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By: Ph.D.s from the previous decade need not apply? We ain’t got the do-re-mi! : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1087922 Tue, 11 Sep 2012 15:49:08 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1087922 [...] When we ran a search in the History department last year, we were instructed that we could not consider applicants who were either tenured or those who had the equivalent experience of a tenured Associate Professor, but we were not instructed to limit our applications pool otherwise.  And indeed, our four campus finalists were people whose Ph.D.s ranged from 2006 to 2011, and they ranged in age from perhaps their mid-30s to their mid-50s.  I don’t think English is interested in age discrimination.  My guess is that English is looking to hire people with less experience instead of more experience, mostly because our salaries are so low and the pre-existing faculty had zero raises–we never get cost-of-living increases, so it was merely a suspension of our merit increases–from 2008 to our paltry raise in 2012. [...]

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By: nicoleandmaggie http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1077663 Wed, 22 Aug 2012 12:56:24 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1077663 Update: They somehow got permission to give me a higher raise than the 10% they’d told me was the best they could do without me going on the market. I am now no longer making less as a newly minted associate than our new hire straight from grad school. (They’re still saving money from what they’d have to give as a counter-offer if I went on the market, but going on the market is now less attractive.) And they gave me a little 1x kick-back from the overhead out of the grant I got this past year.

I feel both valued and that sometimes complaining in advance works.

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By: afemalehistorian http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1064637 Fri, 27 Jul 2012 11:16:06 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1064637 Wait, wait, are you telling me that professors are not the reason the cost of education is going through the roof?

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1064120 Thu, 26 Jul 2012 17:36:44 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1064120 AAUW is, I believe, an advocacy organization for women universities. They collect and analyze a lot of data, and that’s a valuable service. I would say that the information they collect and the studies they publish are of use to women in universities who want to make use of them in order to advance policies or procedures.

I think they also have some scholarships for undergrad and grad students, too.

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By: cgeye http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1064111 Thu, 26 Jul 2012 17:19:23 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1064111 “Historiann, you’ll never finish one book until you have an idea about the next one you want to write.” That applies to a lot of things, procrastination as well as unfinished projects. Good advice.

Dr. H., what the heck does AAUW do? It’s not a union, it doesn’t really support just faculty or staff, so what purpose does it have?

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By: truffula http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1064061 Thu, 26 Jul 2012 15:30:07 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1064061 recently organized

This year is pretty recent.

Thinking about it department by department on my unionized campus, the humanities are leaders for sure but so are faculty in economics and the professional schools, and the sciences; two of our science departments have very strong radical traditions. The engineers are less excited but they participate. They have issues too. We still hire at market-driven rates but when we negotiate contracts we have the opportunity to deal with compression and to protect health care and other benefits. The important thing is that people must recognize that they really do have common cause and that raising everybody up benefits everybody.

We have common cause with students and classified staff as well. Leaders in student government were great allies in our last round of bargaining. We support other unions when they are negotiating.

There are problems, of course. I have a number of colleagues who are opposed to graduate student organization (because it is a “different” kind of job, they say). That’s paternalistic and in my view wrong. But then, I treat students working with me differently than those folks. I expect there is a real divide between humanities and sciences on the topic of student unions. Scientists who manage research programs are bosses and that can certainly change a person’s attitude.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1064047 Thu, 26 Jul 2012 14:53:49 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1064047 Yes, organization is really the only long-term solution. I’m not sure if this would be possible in my state, as I don’t believe there are any state employees represented by unions, and my state has passed a bunch of anti-union legislation in recent years. We’re not “right to work,” but maybe only one step up from that.

Honestly, right now it seems like a better use of my time to work towards winning some major fellowship to help me finish up this current book and to get to work on the third one. That was one great thing that came out of my trip to the Huntington Library last month: I formulated an idea for my next book, which really has motivated me to get to work to finish my current project. As a senior scholar once said to me long ago, “Historiann, you’ll never finish one book until you have an idea about the next one you want to write.”

I know it’s selfish, but I feel like I have at least some control over my scholarship and career, whereas becoming a union organizer in this state would seem to be a bigger and much less certain suck on my time and energy. Also: we are the old A&M school, so mine is a engineering, sci/tech, and business heavy campus, and I know from a previous effort in collecting signatures for a petition that there are several departments that refused to sign and/or faculty reps who just refused to even ask their faculty if they were interested in signing. I’m afraid that it would be only humanities scholars who are interested at all in organizing.

If any of you know of any faculties that have recently organized, I’d like to hear about them. My sense is that the vast majority of organized faculties were organized in the 1950s-60s, when universities were growing and the union movement was still strong.

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By: Perpetua http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1064007 Thu, 26 Jul 2012 13:20:31 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1064007 I think the near-universal problem with salaries at most universities (esp. public ones in the US) is compression at the associate level (and perhaps advanced assistant). It’s the inevitable result of rising salaries at the assistant level (offers are always going go up) and no raises. My uni seems to have zero interest in improving compression. I’ve never seen a raise cycle, so I don’t know how those are handled. At my previous uni, the departments administered their own raises via the executive committee, which looked at merit, but also compression in order to put the money where it was most needed as well as deserved. Here (where for the past 15 years, 9 have been raise-free, including COLA, so you can imagine that if you’ve been here for 15 years, you might be making LESS than when you started), the only way to be an associate and get a raise is to get an outside offer. Then the money can really roll. Someone I know was offered a matching salary (matching to the offer), which meant an $8 k raise; person was close to tenure and at tenure would get an additional 10%, so in a couple of years ze was going to the equivalent of $15 k raise. Pretty impressive, and pretty undemocratic, if you think about the effect that that would have on compression in the department. I’m happy for ze, but I hate all that outside offer nonsense. It’s a waste of everyone’s time and money. Universities could actually spend LESS if they took their outside offer cash and their “hiring stars” cash and applied to small but steady increases, and retain more faculty through you know, making them feel valued, rather than requiring validation contingent on outside offers.

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By: Spanish Prof http://www.historiann.com/2012/07/25/i-at-least-aint-got-the-do-re-mi/comment-page-1/#comment-1063797 Thu, 26 Jul 2012 06:22:37 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=19241#comment-1063797 I have to say I am among the lucky ones. How raises are calculated at my institution is a secret better guarded than Coca-Cola secret formula. But they do exist. As a matter of fact, next year I’ll be making 10K + than when I was hired (Fall 2007). Getting the envelope in March that announces your salary for next year is always a guessing game. The worst year the raise was $420, the best year, it was $2800. At this point, my salary is very competitive. The same is not the case for tenured professors (i guess they are less worried about losing them). I know salary compression exist (the best paid Full professor in my dept makes $25K more than me), so I will probably not be as cheerful in 7 years. I also know that competitive salaries are a very new policy in my university (an Associate professor, a single mother with two kids, told me that 6 years ago she went to the president and told him: “I just want to let you know that if I were making 5K less, I would qualify for food stamps. Do you really want that kind of publicity in the local newspaper?”). I hope the new policy lasts.

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