Comments on: Call for Contributors: Women in Early America http://www.historiann.com/2011/06/15/call-for-contributors-women-in-early-america/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sat, 20 Sep 2014 17:08:06 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2011/06/15/call-for-contributors-women-in-early-america/comment-page-1/#comment-838085 Thu, 16 Jun 2011 01:43:42 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=15586#comment-838085 I promise, after I get done with this one project–which just might, in a coda, slightly graze into the 20th century–I’m going back to Kansas (or at least I mean to Canarsie), and doing the dishes, and finishing my homework, and stop teasing my sister, and not crossing Federal Boulevard ever again. At least for a long time. That’s a crazy scary neighborhood over there, if I say.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2011/06/15/call-for-contributors-women-in-early-america/comment-page-1/#comment-838050 Thu, 16 Jun 2011 00:03:25 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=15586#comment-838050 Interesting point. I’ve given up on the idea of our field as restricted to ca. 1789, and fully accept that by the time I kick it, our field (if it still exists) will likely extend to 1850 or 1876 or 1900. I can’t speak for the editor of the project, but I’m assuming that he know which way the wind blows, and since he presents papers at SHEAR, that he’s open to a catholic (small-c) interpretation of the “Revolutionary era.”

(I may be among the last people in the U.S. who can read 17th C English handwriting even now, although I’ve never mastered the crazzy scrawl of John Winthrop.)

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By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2011/06/15/call-for-contributors-women-in-early-america/comment-page-1/#comment-838047 Wed, 15 Jun 2011 23:53:59 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=15586#comment-838047 Just a quibble or query on periodization here, not that it isn’t an author’s, editor’s, compiler’s, publisher’s absolute prerogative to make those definitions, but just as a discussion item. I’ve been something of a traditionalist early Americanist, centered in the (long) 18th century and recognizing it’s antecedents as “early” but somewhat chagrinned at the seeming “bracket creep” by which the center of gravity moved forward after the 1980s deeper and deeper into nationhood, with it’s sometime tendency to impose categories of nationhood and nation-making in awkward ways. But equally chagrinned, now that I’ve impulsively “hot-pursued” a topic deep into the mid-19th century, to imagine “early” as having been recaptured by customary notions of beginnings, middles, and ends. When does the “Revolutionary era” end for this project’s purposes, and is this hitched to curricular boundary making for course adoption purposes or some larger substantive or theoretical concept?

I can obviously query the author on this, but like I say, just for discussion. Sounds like a great project.

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