Comments on: Professor Palin’s history of feminism http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sat, 20 Sep 2014 07:56:15 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Cor http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-749315 Mon, 06 Dec 2010 05:29:17 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-749315

Third Wave feminism–whatever that is

I like Alison Piepmeyer’s short and sweet article on the distinction between “postfeminism” and the third wave.

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By: Emma http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747745 Wed, 01 Dec 2010 15:39:54 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747745 How did a thread on feminist history turn into a pi$$ing contest between a couple of doods?

And here I was, trying to start a catfight among the gurlz.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747434 Wed, 01 Dec 2010 00:55:01 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747434 S’okay. (Fratguy picked up the rope, too.)

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By: Comrade PhysioProf http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747432 Wed, 01 Dec 2010 00:49:47 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747432 Sorry about the d00dly derailing, Historiann.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747388 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 21:51:29 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747388 How did a thread on feminist history turn into a pi$$ing contest between a couple of doods?

Just askin’. And, thanks for your cooperation.

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By: JackDanielsBlack http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747385 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 21:39:47 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747385 Using the royal “we” now, CPP? I am a little disappointed that I haven’t been able to provoke your usual juvenile torrent of cussin’ on this thread. Maybe next time?

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By: Comrade PhysioProf http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747370 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 20:25:06 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747370 Dude, instead of confirmation-bias trolling Wikipedia and PBS, how about telling us what “things” the “activist” Sarah Palin is gonna “get done”? We’re still waiting.

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By: JackDanielsBlack http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747215 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 10:47:59 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747215 Mamie, when you say that “Carrie Nation had nothing to do with the WCTU”, are you sure you have your facts right? Quoting from a biography of Carrie on the PBS web site,
“While Carrie Nation was certainly among their most colorful members, the members of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, founded in 1874, left more in their wake than strewn glass. Once the largest women’s organization in the country, the WCTU concerned itself with issues ranging from health and hygiene, prison reform, and world peace.”
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/1900/peopleevents/pande4.html

Her Wikipedia entry also mentions that she founded a local chapter of the WCTU in Medicine Lodge, Kansas. If these folks are incorrect, perhaps you could send them a note and get their info corrected. I’m not a historian, but if this is wrong it should certainly be corrected–and who better to do it than a prominent woman historian, so that folks such as myself will not continue to be misinformed?

More from her PBS biography:

“Between 1900 and 1910 she was arrested some 30 times after leading her followers in the destruction of one water hole after another with cries of “Smash, ladies, smash!” Prize-fighter John L. Sullivan was reported to have run and hid when Nation burst into his New York City saloon. Self-righteous and formidable, Nation mocked her opponents as “rum-soaked, whiskey-swilled, saturn-faced rummies.”

Quite a gal, and her gift for invective reminds me a lot of Sarah!

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747058 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 05:01:34 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747058 That’s right, Mamie–thanks for the correction. (I’m not a modern historian after all–I’m not as attentive to the details post-1820 or so as I should be!) Re: abortion and infanticide–from what I understand, some feminists in the 19th C were against abortion not because it killed fetuses, but because abortion in dodgy, unsterile conditions killed *women,* who were put in desperate circumstances for the reasons you list.

FrauTech–Schwartzenegger might not be in the same strain as Reagan, Bush, and Palin, but he’s a Republican whom the Democrats laughed at and mocked all the way to his victory party. That was the only connection I meant to imply: instead of being taken seriously, he was met with derision.

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By: Mamie http://www.historiann.com/2010/11/28/professor-palins-history-of-feminism/comment-page-1/#comment-747056 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 04:52:11 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=13392#comment-747056 So sorry I’m late arriving. Not that the eminent historian JDB cares, BUT, good grief, Carrie Nation had nothing to do with the WCTU. Her organization was the Anti-Saloon League. Entirely different. We don’t hear about Carrie Nation as a feminist leader because, well, she wasn’t. (I’m not sure JDB is wrong, however, in comparing Carrie Nation with Sarah Palin–except I don’t think Carrie Nation parleyed her notoriety into quite so much money.)

And while it’s certainly possible Stanton considered abortion infanticide, it’s also worth noting that actual WCTU members defended women who committed infanticide. They considered infanticide an unfortunate but understandable outcome when men raped or seduced vulnerable women. In fact, if you read the coverage of cases of infanticide in the late 19th century, there was a lot of sympathy for the women involved–which might give Stanton’s position an unexpected nuance.

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