Comments on: Summer bounty in Quebec, 1749 http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sun, 21 Sep 2014 09:59:39 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Koop http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-675272 Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:45:59 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-675272 Kalm’s summer meal sounds delicious—imagine the entry for February-March dining would be a good deal leaner, though!

Vellum–I’d be surprised if anyone in North America (Anglophone Canada included) taught Quebecois French. I’m sure you learned standard Parisian French.

Students of Canada’s French Immersion programme (where the mission is to educate Anglophones in Quebecois culture) often acquire a blend of standard and Quebecois French (even when Québec is several thousand miles distant). No outright joual, of course, but we certainly learned that cars were “chars,” dollars, “piastres,” and hot dogs,”chien chauds”—expressions that sound pretty archaic to Parisian ears. Meals were “petit-déjeuner,” (or “déjeuner”) “dîner,” and “souper,” but everyone understood if you used other terms.

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By: Western Dave http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-675116 Tue, 27 Jul 2010 17:59:30 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-675116 Peter Kalm is a great resource. His description of Philadelphia is part of our rising 10s summer reading assignment.

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By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-674524 Mon, 26 Jul 2010 15:57:03 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-674524 My father grew up on a farm (well south of Quebec), and the late 19th early 20th century food vocabulary lingered in his voice forever, whereby it was breakfast, dinner, supper, and the last meal was decidedly the lightest. In my suburban upbringing, “lunch” was at mid-day, and whether the nighttime fest was supper or dinner, it had *better* be a major meal, to get you through the long spell ahead. Plus, we ate all the time out of refrigerators that didn’t exist on the farm, and under post-war and depression rules of engagement that would have seemed incomprehensible back there.

I got slammed with a 9-Euro charge for “petit-dejeuner” in my dumpy Paris hotel last week that I had cluelessly conflated with the “free” breakfasts that American motel chains give you before sending you out onto the Interstate.

Per Kalm was coming from Sweden, and it’s interesting to reflect on the combination of latitudinal similarities and cultural differences through which he would have looked at New France foodways. I think in northern places they worked with razor-thin growing season margins and really had to presume the possibility of starving times, especially with regard to the wheat crop.

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By: Comrade PhysioProf http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-674513 Mon, 26 Jul 2010 15:18:59 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-674513 Wow, that was some seriously impaired typing! lolz

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By: Comrade PhysioProf http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-674268 Mon, 26 Jul 2010 02:50:36 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-674268 If you’re gonna drink gin with fucken cucumbers, you gotta use hendricks’s gin. thayt shit has a fucktoin of cucumber flvoers in it and goes great with cucumbers in the fucken glass.

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By: Ros http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-674264 Mon, 26 Jul 2010 02:41:26 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-674264 “The sort of vegetable melange Kalm describes on fast days is a kind of national dish–cabbage, onions, carrots, beans, turnips, or what have you from the garden all boiled and served together.”

Or boiled with beef, and then, for some reason, it’s known as ‘bouilli de legumes’, at least in my family. Traditional simmered dish, done at least once a week starting mid-July.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-674175 Sun, 25 Jul 2010 23:12:28 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-674175 Vellum–I’d be surprised if anyone in North America (Anglophone Canada included) taught Quebecois French. I’m sure you learned standard Parisian French.

Janice–I was a skeptic of the boiled veggie melange, but if you don’t overcook them, keep everything very fresh looking and tasting, and serve it with some aioli on the side–it’s delicious. I’ve been served that mess o’veg at truck stops, fine restaurants, and even in a private home. I think it speaks to the fact that in a cold climate, the season for fresh food was short and therefore all the more to be enjoyed. Pulling together a mixed boil of whatever was on hand was a way for hardworking people to enjoy the benefits of the season without undue fuss. (And what could be simpler than cucumbers and cream, or salted cucumbers and radishes?)

Susan: I too found the observations about the colonial French vs. colonial English interesting. (And it’s unsurprising to read someone pronouncing the English dirtier than the French!)

I’m glad you all found this appetizing. We’ve been doing hikes and bike rides the last few weekends, which with all of the yoga I started last week is making me really famished all of the time.

I’ll have to try CPP’s suggestion for a cocktail next time I’ve got a huge watermelon. I’ve whizzed melon wtih lime juice and little bit of honey in a blender and then strained it–much better and tastier than an energy drink or Vitamin Water. Now that I think of it, I need to make some cucumber-infused cocktails this summer. . . like a G & T with cucumber and basil essence, or perhaps lavender?

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By: Comrade PhysioProf http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-674018 Sun, 25 Jul 2010 19:09:19 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-674018

A friend of mine is a server at a restaurant with a special Sunday brunch with mimosas.

Last night we were at our friend’s restaurant eating dinner, and one of his waiters was experimenting with a different Sunday brunch beverage: dry champagne with freshly pureed and strained watermelon. He had us test it, and it was absofuckenlutely delicioso!

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By: Janice http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-673980 Sun, 25 Jul 2010 18:18:02 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-673980 My husband’s from Quebec and he still waxes nostalgic for the food of his home province. We can get a pretty good tortiere here at the grocers, though — one of the many upsides to living in a very francophone part of Ontario!

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By: squadratomagico http://www.historiann.com/2010/07/25/summer-bounty-in-quebec-1749/comment-page-1/#comment-673968 Sun, 25 Jul 2010 18:05:35 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=11898#comment-673968 OK, now I’m ready for brunch! Thanks for whetting my appetite so thoroughly.
A friend of mine is a server at a restaurant with a special Sunday brunch with mimosas. That’s my plan for the day!

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