Comments on: Professional presentations: can you recycle? http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sun, 21 Sep 2014 12:24:08 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: joseph mchugh attorney http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-2251461 Tue, 01 Jul 2014 23:09:19 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-2251461 Alsߋ visit my webpage; joseph mchugh attorney

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By: Reading-from-the-Page in Presentation: Crazy’s Defense « Anumma http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-609133 Fri, 30 Apr 2010 12:39:15 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-609133 [...] Bible types) around the time of our November professional conference, but at other times as well. Other fields also make their own observations (h/t to Bittersweet [...]

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By: takingitoutside http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-607006 Tue, 27 Apr 2010 14:49:36 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-607006 Comrade PhysioProf:

My conclusion was, basically, that the established theory on a given issue was insufficient when applied to a certain class of media. To make that argument, I had to go through each of the applicable major works of theory, with a focus on the relevant subsections and points. Also, since most of the theorists were reacting to each other, I had to proceed in a particular order. The problem was not keeping things straight so much as keeping the order of things straight. For example, in a science (or at least a science fair) presentation, you wouldn’t state the procedure before outlining the problem.

It was definitely a tight paper, but it worked out really well. My next paper won’t necessarily be directly read, but that strategy fit with this paper.

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By: historyprof http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-606528 Mon, 26 Apr 2010 23:16:03 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-606528 OK, I’m late into this discussion. But I wanted to admit having recycled versions of a paper for different audiences, with different tilts; AND having given a conference talk which condensed my recently published book into 15 minutes (think that’s easy???). I was unsure (and felt slightly cheap) about the recap, but as it turned out, hardly anyone even KNEW the book had been published, let alone knew what it was about, and the paper was warmly received (and fit extremely well with the panel). So despite all the “rules” rambling around in my head about what we should and should not do, ever, I find myself straying beyond the boundaries–and not to ill effect. I hope.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-606264 Mon, 26 Apr 2010 14:44:43 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-606264 Sorry, Jonathan–I agree with Indyanna, Tony, and John S., above. I think Tony makes a great point about presentation: we’ve all seen people “read” their papers well and poorly. I’ve seen scholars read two or three pages from a 50-page paper, and then extemporize randomly, then flip through the paper to locate another two or three pages to read. That seemed to me to be an especially ineffective combination of the two speaking styles. (All of the randomness and lack of rigor of “off the cuff” remarks, mixed with some dull verbatim readings in-between.)

Perhaps where we can agree is on the value of performing well, however one goes about presenting one’s work. But in the end, I’m with John S.’s and Indyanna’s point about sufficient scholarly rigor in conference presentations being part of the compact between presenters and our audiences at conferences. When I lecture to students, I speak much more informally and return and return again to a couple of key themes. But, I expect my conference audiences already to have sufficient background to follow a more complex argument and/or collection of evidence.

And, we could all do worse than to imitate NZD, in every conceivable way.

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By: Please stop reading your conference papers. « More or Less Bunk http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-606168 Mon, 26 Apr 2010 13:32:40 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-606168 [...] stop reading your conference papers. 26 04 2010 Over the weekend, I provoked a friendly disagreement with the illustrious and extremely entertaining Historiann over whether it was OK to read your [...]

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By: Tony Grafton http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-606166 Mon, 26 Apr 2010 13:16:35 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-606166 A lot depends on HOW people read their papers. Any experienced classroom teacher should be able to read through his/her draft a few times in the 24 hours before the session or talk takes place and then present it pretty much verbatim, but as one speaking rather than reading. I’ve seen many dazzling presentations that took this form–Natalie Zemon Davis is a dab hand at it, for example, and though the rest of us aren’t going to reach her level, it’s one more way in which we can learn by imitating her (I’ve had the good fortune to spend much of my career doing that).

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By: John S. http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-605993 Mon, 26 Apr 2010 04:35:14 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-605993 I second Indyanna. I would actually find watching a scholar give me his/her “off the cuff” comments as much a violation of the implied speaker-audience contract as reading work that is already published. I mean, can you really engage in a serious give and take of an off the cuff? Is the presenter likely to make any revisions to the paper as a result of the conversation?

Moreover, I hope that the classroom model doesn’t quite fit. I would like to think that I have a better ability to listen to scholarly work and process it than a 20 year old undergrad.

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By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-605881 Mon, 26 Apr 2010 01:36:33 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-605881 Off the cuff is for out in the corridor. As has been noted above, this mode encourages and/or lends itself to anecdotalism, to the impulsive intrusion of “breaking insights,” and to other things that are best left for the receptions. Panel presentations are for the actual transmission of research results–albeit often in progress–and since in this era at least most research doesn’t lend itself to charts and graphs, and since the inclusion of the actual language of historical actors and agents is often desired, a text is often the best method. Admittedly, this ceremony is a subgenre of its own and a performance–like having afternoon tea–and it’s learned behavior for the listeners as much as for presenters that can seem silly if you look right at it.

But recent alternatives like “poster sessions” at humanities meetings end up looking forlorn at best, and electronically pre-circulated papers often don’t get read. For that reason, presenters feel bound to begin with summaries made “off the cuff,” which often get off-track.

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By: Jonathan Rees http://www.historiann.com/2010/04/24/professional-presentations-can-you-recycle/comment-page-1/#comment-605870 Mon, 26 Apr 2010 00:54:03 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=10695#comment-605870 Historiann:

OK, I’ll grant you there are perhaps more shameful things about the historical profession (adjunct exploitation, for example), but this one is still really bad. If you can’t talk coherently off the cuff about your own research for twenty minutes, what on Earth can you talk about on the fly? What must the classes of someone who can’t do this for their own research be like?

My brother is an economist at CU Denver and he just kills me on this every time a historian shows up at one of his conferences. While I hate to admit he’s right about anything, I think he’s right on this one. If they can do it, we can do it.

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