Comments on: American cuisine before Julia Child, part II http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sat, 20 Sep 2014 07:56:15 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Jerrell Vankirk http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-960028 Wed, 08 Feb 2012 02:37:08 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-960028 In support of my learning reasons, I all the time used to download the video lectures from YouTube, as it is easy to fan-out from there.

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By: Kathleen Lowrey http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393772 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 15:14:58 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393772 Indyanna — sounds like a fun party, and thanks for the evocative cat story! It reminded me of my late lamented cat who clearly considered any use of the can opener except on tuna cans an outrage.

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By: Erica http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393707 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 13:08:01 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393707 I own a fondue pot, but use it slightly less than once a year. Oddly, it feels like too much work, which is logically silly when comparing to the prep, cooking, and clean up for a regular meal. It is fun and yummy, though!

@ Historiann — the cocktail recipe reminds me very much of college days, particularly one summer internship when I worked at a company with four other students, all of whom were frat boys, and all of whom spent their evenings getting creatively plastered. (If they had put as much effort into working every day as they did into finding fun new combinations of booze every night, we probably could have solved global warming.) Most cocktails are not invented for their delicious, subtle flavor… they’re pretty much just exercises in visual splendour and maximum alcohol content!

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By: Digger http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393663 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 10:19:44 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393663 Fondue isn’t dead; there’s a whole chain of restaurants across the country called Melting Pot. I cannot report on the experience, however, as the one closest to us has had some issues with food safety. We did fondue when I was a kid; it’s actually lots of fun. Though I don’t think I’d want to go near one of those new-fangled chocolate fountain things.

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By: Mother of ALL http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393566 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 04:52:14 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393566 Shame on you young folks for making fun of fondue! I still have two pots which I used about 2 years ago. Fondue is such an easy, relaxing way to entertain. I usually do a meat and cheese or meat and dessert fondue. In fact, i think I will get a party together very soon.
On the matter of creme de menthe, I have a recipe for Creme de Menthe Fudge. I used to make it at Christmas time. the Creme filling was layered between the fudge layers and was really yummy.

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By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393562 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 03:50:25 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393562 Back from my dinner party, not too early, not too late, to report. It was a casual but fairly elegant patio thing. We made and drank Pina Coladas, which–notwithstanding the goofy song of the same title–were pretty refreshing. We had fancy chicken cutlets grilled outside, pesto salad, another salad, corn on the cob, some fruit somethings, coffee, and desert–some fancy cookies I b(r)ought. Not a cookbook in sight, so it was a pretty intuitive enterprise. I got the kiddie-table level jobs: open some cans, husk corn, set the table, stay out of the way. I reported on the thread-chat. Julie and Julia was pretty much on everyone’s lips.

The cat got mad when ze heard me opening the cans, and it turned out not to be gourmet cat casserole! Sue me.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393532 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 02:00:18 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393532 caseyOR, and anyone else interested in 1950s mixology and cocktail tastes: the Stinger is the first drink listed in the Picture Cook Book list of drinks! Here’s their recipe:
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STINGER (p. 137)

5 parts brandy
1 part white creme de menthe

Shake vigorously with ice cubes. Strain into chilled glass.
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That just sounds nasty to me, even if it is the white creme de menthe. Like a recipe to cure dyspepsia in drunks or something. (I was offered Spirits of Peppermint as a child to settle an upset stomach.)

Even weirder are the recipes for the “Brandy Float” (“Pour about 3/4 of a glass of creme de menthe. Add a little brandy, which will float on top.”) Good lord! Or, check out the “Green Dragon,” which is “1 part chartreuse, 1 part cognac, Mix the ingredients and pour over ice.” Bleh. Maybe that was what they served for drinks at that rooftop Chinese brunch in San Francisco?

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By: caseyOR http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393306 Mon, 03 Aug 2009 21:46:09 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393306 I am a child of the ’50s-’60s, and those pictures remind me of the entertaining my parents did. While dinner parties most usually involved family (my father had 7 sibs), cocktail parties with friends were quite the rage. My father had the Time-Life cooking series. He and my mother devoted quite a bit of time to preparing h’or d’oeuvres, both the cooking and the presentation. And everyone dressed up. I can’t remember the last time I really dressed up to go out.

Something one doesn’t see as much of today is the full and complete liquor cabinet. People I know might have wine in the house and beer, and maybe gin or vodka in the freezer. In my childhood, everyone had multiple bottles of spirits and mixers. My parents kept their favorites on hand, but also the particular brand of scotch my uncle drank and the exact bourbon favored by a number of my aunts. By the way, creme de menthe was used to make a popular after dinner drink called a stinger. It combined creme de menthe with brandy.

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By: Kathleen Lowrey http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393287 Mon, 03 Aug 2009 21:35:32 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393287 Historiann — it’s good to know I am not alone in my one-dish philosophy! At my house, we alternate week by week, and my weeks serve to set off the splendor of my husband’s cooking, is how I like to think about it :) But self-deprecating jokes aside, I think there is a bit of feminist lesson about housework in there: often the excuse is, oh, but my wife is just better at [cooking, cleaning, laundry, etc.] so it makes sense for her to do all of it, all the time. But, while in our case the gender dynamics are reversed, the logic remains the same: no matter how good you are at something which requires daily work it’s (a) nice to have a break from it and (b) nice to have your talents appreciated as talents, and not taken for granted as the status quo.

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By: Susan http://www.historiann.com/2009/08/03/american-cuisine-before-julia-child-part-ii/comment-page-1/#comment-393206 Mon, 03 Aug 2009 20:40:21 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=6681#comment-393206 How funny. I will do dinner parties for 6-8, and it’s very nice, but I’m always exhausted afterwards… And driving does sort of cut down on the amount of drinking you can do. But last Christmas I had a “drinks” party, and everyone stayed until 9 PM, even though there were no main dishes at all!

The only creme de menthe I can imagine drinking again is white creme de menthe (if it exists any more): on the rocks, it tastes like drinking an alcoholic mint chip ice cream. Seriously.

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