Comments on: OAH wrap-up, part I: Borderlands, Oysters, Strangers, and–who invited Norovirus? http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Mon, 22 Sep 2014 04:23:22 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: OAH Throw -- Er, I Mean --Wrap-Up - Tenured Radical - The Chronicle of Higher Education http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-840716 Tue, 21 Jun 2011 21:39:28 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-840716 [...] and Your Favorite Radical is in the Detroit Airport making use of a Boingo Hotspot (I love Boingo.) Historiann and I have so much in common, but now we have one more thing in common: we were both violently ill [...]

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By: OAH wrap-up, Part II: Gender and Sexuality in Early American History : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-275543 Tue, 31 Mar 2009 15:03:09 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-275543 [...] the Organization of American Historians’ annual meeting in Seattle.  (In case you missed it, Part I of my wrap-up is here.)  As I was pulling myself together for my 8:30 a.m. session, I ran into Tenured Radical, who [...]

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By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-275068 Tue, 31 Mar 2009 03:00:58 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-275068 gotcha! mais oui.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-274596 Mon, 30 Mar 2009 19:27:19 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-274596 Please, Indyanna–let’s say nothing about republicanism itself!

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By: Indyanna http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-274550 Mon, 30 Mar 2009 18:10:52 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-274550 It seems that high-concepts in historical work are kind of like time-release capsules. They metabolize fairly quickly in their specific contexts and then the patent runs out and they go generic. Anybody can use them for anything. I’m not sure that White’s retrospective caveat is all that unusual. I think, for example, of how Linda Kerber’s republican motherhood got carried all over creation. To say nothing of republicanism itself.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-274502 Mon, 30 Mar 2009 16:43:01 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-274502 GayProf, Bolton was mentioned–Turner wasn’t. Turner was my addition to the mix, although the work Jane Merritt cited all referenced Turner in terms of the evolution from his concept of a “frontier” to a contemporary North American borderlands approach.

I think the pre-1848 stuff is where borderlands-as-buzzword is taking off. Post-1848 and especially modern U.S.-Mexican borderlands is really a different animal, I think, because it is so focused on that border and not on the U.S.-Canadian border. Whereas pre-1848 Northern borderlands people like me are trying to make that connection to S/SW borderlands scholarship. (At least, it seems like most of us read the S/SW stuff, but I’m not at all convinced that the S/SW people read northern/NE borderlands books and articles at all.)

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By: GayProf http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-274488 Mon, 30 Mar 2009 16:13:33 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-274488 We in Chicano/a studies have been suspicious of the relatively recent interest in “borderlands.” Indeed, it’s interesting that a panel on “borderlands” would start with Turner rather than Herbert Eugene Bolton, the guy often credit with inventing “borderlands” studies. And I’m sure nobody even bothered to mention Américo Paredes.

You’re right about buzz words and trends. They live for a bit and then burn out.

But, then, I think of myself as doing a “borderlands” topic.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-274342 Mon, 30 Mar 2009 13:00:30 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-274342 dance–to be clear, no one on the Robert Love panel talked about Atlantic World history. Salinger’s and Dayton’s work is firmly within an Anglo-American colonial urban history context, despite the title of the panel. I agree with you, BTW, about AW and borderlands being more useful than “middle ground” turned out to be. (Richard White was himself rather amazed by how so many people picked up that term and ran with it, when he was clearly writing about a specific time and place and not proposing it as a model for Euro-Indian relations in North America generally.)

Andrew Mc–HA! But, I think Pacific World/Pacific Rim studies are hot now, aren’t they?

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By: AndrewMc http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-274290 Mon, 30 Mar 2009 11:29:19 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-274290 I realized that “Atlantic World” had lost all meaning when I spoke to someone who claimed to be an Atlanticist. Subject of hir book? The Phillipines.

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By: dance http://www.historiann.com/2009/03/29/oah-wrap-up-part-i-borderlands-oysters-strangers-and-who-invited-norovirus/comment-page-1/#comment-274126 Mon, 30 Mar 2009 06:58:08 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=4285#comment-274126 I was going to defend both borderlands and Atlantic world as useful—but then the Robert Love bullet seemed to exemplify exactly how Atlantic has lost any explanatory power. But I think they both still offer lots for people who are actually *doing* borderlands or Atlantic work, rather than just leaping on a trendy title. I feel like both borderlands and Atlantic have already proven stronger than “middle ground” (as has Mediterrean), but that may just be my perspective. They are also both very good teaching units, I think—bigger than national histories but much more coherent than world.

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