Comments on: Why do conservatives oppose publicly funded contraception? http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Sat, 20 Sep 2014 20:19:58 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Big ‘ifs’ for some… | Gender and Technology Spring 2009 http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-247450 Mon, 02 Mar 2009 19:19:50 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-247450 [...] thought this post by Historiann was [...]

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By: Creative Joy » Blog Archive » Pro-Choice Evangelicals, and Religious Scientists. http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-242211 Thu, 26 Feb 2009 08:31:51 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-242211 [...] white evangelicals have been among its fiercest opponents.” It goes nicely along with Historiann’s question: “why do conservatives oppose publicly funded contraception”? Her answer: because it [...]

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By: bruce nahin http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-242158 Thu, 26 Feb 2009 07:13:35 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-242158 Historiann, as always a pleasure to discuss isssue with you- This abortion discussion is as yu suggest and Satsuma too, that need not be a defining issue in discussing feminist issues. We saw what that did in the Palin situation ad we shouldnt repeat it. New Agenda is open to both views ( big tent)understanding the(abortion) issue as you raised above creates divisiveness when the movt needs unity of purpose

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By: Satsuma http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-241794 Thu, 26 Feb 2009 01:15:23 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-241794 I think women should spend as much time as possible debating the issues both liberal and conservative within a woman powerful political context. Not all women are comfortable with abortion as an option, but they powerfully are FOR women’s other equality issues. I call abortion the black hole of women’s energy, and feel rather distant from the whole fracus.

I do tend to agree with some conservatives that enabling women to become more sexually available to men is a mistake. While men seem to be consumers of sex, and not very damaged by all their affairs, and prostitutes on the side (gay and straight)-McGreevy and Spitzer, hey don’t forget Edwards too (Kennedy just gets women drunk and drowns them) I look to the women I know who didn’t fair all that well by the time they got to their 50s. We have to look at birth control as power for women, not a male centric excuse to pressure more young women to have sex when they really don’t want it. Get rid of those stupid high school proms!! But I digress.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-241426 Wed, 25 Feb 2009 18:54:19 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-241426 Bruce–thanks for your comment. I think there is plenty of room in the tent for pro-life feminism! Many of my pro-choice friends disagree, but I’ve taught at two Catholic universities now, and learned that there are a lot of young Catholic women who would identify themselves as feminist were it not for their sense that being a feminist must necessarily mean being completely pro-choice.

I disagree with pro-life feminism, but I don’t think it’s fair to call it antifeminist.

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By: bruce nahin http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-241418 Wed, 25 Feb 2009 18:30:31 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-241418 This pro life conservative believes that women who can not afford contraception(pill, iud etc but not abortion) should receive it as part of Medicaid-No I do not think “”women are good only for reproduction ” as my previously blogs here and other sites so clearly establish- I am a feminist(male version) just pro life

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-240630 Wed, 25 Feb 2009 04:31:46 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-240630 Ha-ha, Rad! Sure: Libertarianism would be a great philosophy if we lived in a world where all children are above average and no one ever got sick or was disabled for any part of their lives. And, let’s legalize pot! No wonder it appeals mostly to younger, wealthier people–keeping all your own money sounds great when you’ve got more than enough, and you’re not facing a ruinious financial sinkhole (natural disaster, old age, a disabled child, a catastrophic illness.)

I had my flirtation with Libertarianism, back in the fat Clinton years when the Feds had a budget surplus, and we were all on our way to Dow 36,000, and the internet was (somehow?) going to make us all super-rich. Ahhh–good times, weren’t they? The thing I like about Libertarians is that they’re optomistic and they embrace new technologies without fear. But, they seem willfully to accept any evidence from real life (global climate change, for example) that might harsh their buzz.

Ok, now back to the subject at hand. (I actually still agree with the pot legalization bit.)

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By: Rad Readr http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-240625 Wed, 25 Feb 2009 04:19:32 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-240625 Historiann, you are right not to equate Scott’s point with Libertarian positions — but can you keep the attacks on Libertarians coming!!!

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By: John S. http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-240423 Wed, 25 Feb 2009 01:12:51 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-240423 I think it is also important to consider (though I disagree with the position) that conservatives attempting to restrict abortion rights and access to contraception are trying to “help” women, in their own way. Think about all the hand-wringing over the “hook up culture” that American youths live in, or Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy’s recent decision worrying about the psychological trauma that women who have had abortions experience. (Yes, I know that regulations on contraception and abortion are not the same, but I hope you will grant the point.)

In each case, you have individuals deciding that women need protection from engaging in behavior that will damage them emotionally, and taking steps to protect women from those choices. If contraception is available, well, then young women might be more inclined to have more sexual partners, which will they will later regret; thus “we” (society and/or the government) need to discourage that.

There is a paternalist aspect to this, of course, but I would also say a morally maternalist one as well. There are both men and women in my family who think that neither men nor women capable of making their own choices regarding sexuality , so someone else (a man living in Italy wearing a mitre, perhaps?) should make these decisions for them. The idea of “benefit” is culturally constructed. Many cultural conservatives opposed to particular reproductive rights really do thin they are helping the people they are trying to restrict.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2009/02/24/why-do-conservatives-oppose-publicly-funded-contraception/comment-page-1/#comment-240368 Wed, 25 Feb 2009 00:46:29 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=3651#comment-240368 Satsuma–thanks for your comments on this. I agree that it’s mostly about the morality questions, and perhaps more broadly about the leveling of power between the sexes that women’s control of their reproduction implies, although there are a number of libertarians and fiscal conservatives (like perhaps Scott, but I don’t want to speak for him) who oppose programs like this on the grounds that social welfare programs compete against their ideal of small government, 18th century style.

I especially like the point you made earlier about resistance to funding programs that are perceived to benefit only or mostly women. I think this too may be a big part of it, although I would argue that anything that permits women to take care of their reproductive health better by definition benefits their partners and their children, male and female alike.

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