Comments on: How (not) to apply to graduate school http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Tue, 23 Sep 2014 00:05:38 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Van A Schwab http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-1931287 Sun, 23 Feb 2014 05:37:26 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-1931287 After 36 years as a practicing attorney in family law, I am contemplating applying for a post-graduate program in history which was my major at the University of Michigan. While I was encouraged to apply immediately for a PHD in history at the Michigan, I always wanted to be an attorney. However, even while in law school, we were given an opportunity to take a graduate school elective and I worked with a history professor on a paper on the Israel-Arab conflict and possible resolutions. This was completed in 1978. I have tried to read some historical work every week for the past 36 years mainly on subjects between 1815-1960. I would love to do research from a revisionist standpoint on the Allies of WWII and the inevitable Cold War. Is it too late to apply for a post graduate program at 60 years of age. As an undergraduate, I never saw less than an A in any history course and performed well on AP exams coming out of high school in US History and European History. Thank you. Van A. Schwab

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By: Grad school confidential: back by popular demand! : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-1696148 Sun, 06 Oct 2013 16:43:01 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-1696148 […] How (not) to apply to graduate school […]

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By: Matthew W. Hall http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-942124 Fri, 06 Jan 2012 19:50:40 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-942124 I agree that if you’ll only be satisfied with a tenure-track facutly appointment in an individual academic department at a four-year school, you should probably reconsider getting a Ph.D. But, if you are open to a broader diversity of jobs including in related fields combining teaching, administration, publishing, government, and consulting as a professional in your area, you can build a career that is more satisfying and makes a decent living.

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By: So you want to get a Ph.D. in the humanities? : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-734248 Wed, 27 Oct 2010 15:08:51 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-734248 [...] the rest of you in on it.)  And then, if we really can’t talk you out of getting a Ph.D., read this and this.  Best of luck to [...]

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By: Friday food fights! Plus evidence of my evildoing, with links. : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-532356 Fri, 15 Jan 2010 16:27:16 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-532356 [...] How (not) to apply to graduate school, part I and part II:  stems and seeds edition [...]

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By: How not to apply to grad school part II: STEMs and seeds edition : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-437943 Wed, 16 Sep 2009 10:40:05 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-437943 [...] (For more tips, please see last winter’s “How (not) to apply to graduate school.”) [...]

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By: Blonde Bruin http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-318637 Thu, 21 May 2009 07:14:22 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-318637 Thank you so much for posting this topic. I’m a college junior, and in the last month have considered graduate school (other than law school) for the first time in my life. This is hugely helpful, considering that I’ve spent the past 10 years rigorously preparing myself for law school applications and have paid little attention to other options.

After falling in love with literary theory, I’m pretty convinced that I’m going to go for it and at least try out a Master’s before inevitably going to law school. But I do have one question: because my only sincere goal is to pursue academic inquiry for a few more years on a level I know will never afterward be attainable, merely as a brief detour from my eventual goal to practice public interest law, will that hurt my application?

Also, considering that I have a 3.89 GPA and got a 169 on my practice LSAT, I think I may be insane to bypass this (extremely viable) chance to get into the top law schools in the U.S. But–and this might be painfully idealistic–I think I’ll always regret it if I don’t pursue this.

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By: Luke http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-312123 Sat, 09 May 2009 09:56:20 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-312123 Great thread over here. I was just accepted to the M.A. program at Crappy State University, Large Town USA. My undergrad GPA is 3.3, and my history GPA is 3.4. It’s pretty pathetic, and I’m hoping that decent scores on the GRE will get me into some sort of PhD program down the road. I don’t even care which program, as long as I can verify that I have a chance of finishing it relatively quickly. Torture I can handle, but not exaggerated timeliness.

I have read time and time again that someone has gotten a PhD from a decent institution, and considers it a tragedy that they are now teaching at some Community College. This is ridiculous. I plan to use a PhD as a way to get my writing published, and on top of that I will be glad to obtain a teaching position at a high school or community college.

Now, I’m not sure what to write on my applications. Obviously, if I write that my goal is to teach at a high school – well, the committees are going to look down on that. I just write “teaching” because I figure they assume that I am a snotty person that thinks PhDs have a god given right to teach in the university setting.

Honestly, I just think that I was born to do this. I don’t care what it costs or how long it takes. I want to be a historian of the highest caliber – and believe me, I know all about historiography and the difficulty of acquiring source materials. I am confident that I can do this!

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-258168 Thu, 12 Mar 2009 14:29:24 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-258168 Nerdherd–History departments claim to be interdisciplinary these days–this is perhaps one of the reasons that so many American Studies programs have been eaten up by History departments. But, some are more genuinely interested in interdisciplinarity than others, and some faculty are more interested than others–there’s no one way to answer your question. So, I would explore many different programs and carefully select the ones you apply to.

As for funding and financial aid: again, there is no one prescription for getting what you want or need. After reading through various grad programs’ web sites, I would contact the graduate studies director (or chair) and ask her or him your questions about interdisciplinarity and financial aid. The more specific you can be about yourself, your interests, and your questions, the more helpful the grad studies directors can be in their replies to you. Their responses–or lack of responsiveness–will tell you a lot about whether or not you’d be a good fit for those programs.

In general, though, Ph.D. students tend to be better funded than M.A. students–there are some programs that offer TA-ships to M.A. students, but it’s my impression that those goodies (if they exist) tend to be reserved more for the long-haul students. As for your GRE scores–one of the questions you should ask is if there’s a cutoff for a minimum GRE score. (Some large and well-funded departments get so many applications that they may decide that they don’t need to look at anyone with below a 550 or 600 on the verbal GRE, for example.) It might be worth your while to re-take the test, to see if you can get the scores up if you’re at or below the cutoff. Your grades, admissions essay, and letters of rec. will be more important overall, but only if your application gets a look, and it might not if your scores are very low.

Good luck!

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By: Nerdherd http://www.historiann.com/2008/12/02/how-not-to-apply-to-graduate-school/comment-page-1/#comment-258132 Thu, 12 Mar 2009 13:59:31 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=2122#comment-258132 Historiann,

i am thinking of applying to a phd program in either history or social sciences. i am more interested in interdisciplinary studies, but isn’t history at the graduate level taking on more of an interdisciplinary form as well?

also, how can i secure an assistantship or other aid from universities that i apply to? i graduated with honors from an ivy league college, but my gre scores are a little weak. what are the main ingredients (including specific scores and gpa) that would help secure financial aid that does not need to be repaid?

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