Comments on: Ummm, you e-mailed *me* for advice, remember? http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/ History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:41:03 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: High school student: U R doin’ it rite! : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-587577 Sat, 03 Apr 2010 14:33:57 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-587577 [...] recall, we’ve already covered how not to ask strangers for help, high school edition here and grad school edition here and [...]

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By: We get letters. . . some we can do without. : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-539222 Mon, 25 Jan 2010 13:29:55 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-539222 [...] to e-mail them, instead of reading their books.)  From now on, the delete key will be my style.  No good deed goes unpunished, right?  (I wonder:  do physics or chemistry proffies get e-mails like this–or are high school [...]

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By: I can haz homework assignment? : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to the present http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-398186 Sun, 09 Aug 2009 14:16:40 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-398186 [...] some of you regular readers may remember, I had a strange encounter of the e-mail variety last fall when I kindly answered one of these requests from out of the blue.)  Have you heard from graduate students with requests for your biography?  Is this a new kind of [...]

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By: Vidi « Archaeoastronomy http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-140783 Thu, 04 Dec 2008 21:07:40 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-140783 [...] Ummm, you e-mailed *me* for advice, remember? : Historiann : History and sexual politics, 1492 to th… This is the kind of thing that academic blogs do really well. This wouldn’t make an academic journal or conference paper, but it is important. Historiann shows what some female academics have to put up with. [...]

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By: inchoate » to the letter http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-132711 Tue, 25 Nov 2008 01:45:42 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-132711 [...] are receptive to this type of writing. In fact, Historiann’s experience was downright awful. The exchange that really amuses me is Thank you for responding, but at the same time it is not [...]

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By: still a student http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-131366 Sun, 23 Nov 2008 05:24:41 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-131366 Strange. Typically, when I write emails to professors, I start off as formally as possible (irregardless of gender :P). If the professor then responds without a salutation, or type in all lowercase, or what have you, then I assume the bar has been lowered, and don’t necessarily reply with all the formal flourishes. Someguy has it backasswards – it does seem very entitled and rude.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-130302 Sat, 22 Nov 2008 01:25:53 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-130302 Thanks, Olga–you’d be doing your students a favor if you did instruct them a bit. In my experience, until this guy, I’ve never had a complaint that I asked a student not to call my by my first name, or corrected them on their note. They usually apologize–at least over the e-mail. They may have had their own other opinions which they didn’t share with me, which is their right, and if so I appreciate greatly that they didn’t share these other opinions with me. As you note, it’s all about setting the boundaries and enforcing them, isn’t it?

The working conditions you describe are appalling. I’m very sorry. Is there an Adjunct Council or some organization at your university that you could appeal to for some assistance? This is not to excuse the department you’re working for, but sometimes they respond to some friendly requests and a kick in the pants.

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By: olga the bomb thrower http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-130276 Sat, 22 Nov 2008 01:06:43 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-130276 As adjunct faculty, I am very careful of my position as the university denigrates us with pay and sharing an office with 8 people and 1 desk. Standards of behavior are posted in my syllabus and include my right to fail anyone who doesn’t follow them. I wouldn’t have answered the guy after the first reply because he assumes he is more important than you and that he is entitled to your time. That said, I am also available to my students when they need me via email and by phone between regular hours. I seldom comment on the appropriateness of the communication. In the future, I will post “Rules for email communication” as well. They are so slack with spelling and punctuation that it constantly irritates me. Since I teach writing, It is probably my responsibility to instruct them in this genre as well. Thanks for the needed addition to my curriculum.

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By: gail http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-129853 Fri, 21 Nov 2008 17:22:07 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-129853 Is that the choice? Being rude OR ignoring a request for assistance that is presented in an ‘unacceptable’ format due to its lack of formality (and reverence?)?

I’m sure some of my reaction to this comes from working many years in casual technically oriented environments.

I do understand that in some circumstances the lack of key words or phrases can signal a deliberate lack of respect.

When I moved back to the US in the early 70′s after living in a very formal, stratified society for 3 years, the fact that almost everywhere I went everyone, from an entry clerk to doctors and highest managers, assumed they could use my first name without even asking. It was quite a shock, not quite the cultural shock I expected after only three years absense. If may sound like something inconsequential now but that automatic use of my first name signaled ‘lack of respect’ though the intent, in most cases, was far different.

I still think your first reply to the requester was rude. I think rudeness is a choice (one I don’t claim to be innocent of) and not an entitlement. The alternative to rudeness is not automatic silence nor compliance.

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By: Historiann http://www.historiann.com/2008/11/13/ummm-you-e-mailed-me-for-advice-remember/comment-page-2/#comment-129733 Fri, 21 Nov 2008 12:29:45 +0000 http://www.historiann.com/?p=1871#comment-129733 Thanks, Lady Prof. I suppose I should have just hit the “delete” button instead of “being rude” and trying to answer the student’s question. What a terrible, terrible person I am, actually trying to help while also instructing someone in how to conduct professional correspondence!

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